Archive for mp3

Reviews: Opening for the Allmans in 1992

Posted in red devils with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 20, 2010 by J.J.

Two new soundboard-quality recordings have surfaced recently to shine light The Red Devils’ 1992 opening slots for the Allman Brothers. The Sept. 1 Richmond, Va., and Sept. 4 Charlotte, N.C., recordings represent the band’s sixth and eighth opening spots (by our count) for the Brothers.

These recordings document the band working through their setlists, and winning over crowds with their hardworking blues. From the very top, the audio quality is quite high, making these discs an audio treat. That there is no crowd noise coming into the mix is unnerving, as it sounds as though the band finishes songs to complete silence.

Both shows begin with a sturdy shuffle, here called “Hey Baby,” but in reality a mad-libs version of the warhorse “Riding in the Moonlight.” The Richmond gig finds the band sounding quite tentative — solid blues to be sure, but no real fireworks. Just three days later, however, the same tune is crunchier and bouncier, with a pounding two-handed shuffle by Bill Bateman, hot turnarounds and leadwork by Paul Size and a much more confident vocal performance by Lester Butler.

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The nofightin.com store is now open

Posted in red devils, related music with tags , , , , , , on February 18, 2010 by J.J.

Looking for some of the great music we’ve been talking about here? We’ve made it easy for you to get some great tunes with the nofightin.com store on Amazon.com.

Though there are really only two CDs between The Red Devils and 13, there are dozens of other associated records we’d like to turn you on to. We’re going to curate the store to be the best from each member of The Red Devils, their influences and their contemporaries, hopefully giving you a little more of an idea of who’s who on these records.

Heard Lester Butler talk about James Harman, but you don’t know where to start? We’ve got those records, so we can help ya out.

And if you were thinking of scoring a Harman disc, by getting it from the nofightin.com store, we get a little taste and can help keep the site running.

We promise not to burn you with “sounds like The Red Devils” when it doesn’t. Now, not too many bands do sound like the Devils, but if you like them, you might be ready for some of these other artists.

Bootleg review live from Iowa, 1993

Posted in red devils with tags , , , , , , on November 22, 2009 by J.J.

A bootleg of The Red Devils live at the Mississippi Blues Fest at Le Claire Park in Davenport, Iowa, July 2, 1993, is a solid capsule of the band on the summer festival circuit.

It’s not an essential set by any means, and may be of interest only to the most hardcore of collectors. Most of the songs are found in better form and audio quality in several other live sets. What stands out is the band’s almost experimental jamming, coming more than a year into the original lineup’s never-ending tour schedule.

The audio recording comes from a KFMH radio live broadcast of the festival; the announcer mentions other performers that day included Dr. John, Jimmy Ley and Nappy Brown. The poor audio quality of the recording means parts of the music are a wash, though Butler’s vocals are right out front, as are the harp and Paul Size’s lead guitar.
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Remix Devils: Trip-hop experiment

Posted in red devils with tags , , , , , , on July 27, 2009 by J.J.

On the hunt for more Red Devils info, stumbled onto the forum for The Gretsch Pages.

There, member tidalwave_sideburns has uploaded a trip-hop blues track with vocal samples from Muddy Waters and Lester Butler from “King King” (can you pick which ones?). In addition, “Cross Your Heart” is used as a bluesy bed for the cut.

It’s certainly different — and actually quite cool. Give a listen to the MP3 “Oh Yeah Baby” right here.

Found! ‘Louisiana Blues’ rare promo tape 1992

Posted in red devils with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 13, 2009 by J.J.

After years of myths, faded memories, lost opportunities and cold trails, the rarest of Red Devils recordings is discovered, recasting the band as a semi-acoustic traditional blues combo.

Even after the package arrived in the mail, it was still hard to believe the search was over. In our hands was the much-rumored “Louisiana Blues” promo tape. It existed and was ready to be played.

def_american_promo_tape

“Louisiana Blues” is the alpha and omega of The Red Devils’ legend: It is both the first cut released on Def American in the early ’90s, as well as the last remaining musical mystery in the band’s official discography.

Twelve years of Internet queries, e-mails with friends and collectors and several wild goose chases had finally lead to prize: The cassette turned up in Nebraska as a listing on discogs.com before coming to nofightin.com.

There are many reasons why this particular song has eluded collectors and been such a source of confusion for so long:
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